by   May 19 2011   
Out of Memory Line 0 ASP Classic SQL vb scripts. The Out of Memory Line 0 was one issue very difficult to correct when using shared hosting servers.

Out of Memory Line 0 ASP Classic SQL vb scripts.

 

 

NOTE: July 9, 2012: I've seen one server this week eat memory to the point I had to set the applications pool to recycle every 600mb. 

Server 2008 Web (32bit Vista version) Output Caching enabled both "Enable cache" and "Enable kernel cache"

I was looking to disable the cache or to make it drive cache but the Maximum cached response size (in bytes): is locked in and can not be edited in the server I'm working on. 

I'll update this post as I discover some new settings or how to edit the settings I really would like to edit. It appears by selecting the cache physical memory usage dropped completely. My guess it's worded differently from other versions of IIS in that by selecting to enable cache it then starts using the drive cache with memory balanced. Once I find the KB articles I'll know more. But so far, after 1 hour of testing it appears to be the answer for this old server. I thought it was the ASP pages but the pages were cached over and over according to the trace logs from the DebugDiag Tool 1.2.

Use theEdit Output Cache Settingsdialog box to configure settings that affect the entireOutput Cachingfeature. These settings affect all the output caching rules that you configure on theOutput Cachingfeature page.

UI Element List

 

 

Element NameDescription

Enable cache

Enables the IIS output cache, which stores cached responses in user mode.

Note

The IIS output cache is similar to the ASP.NET output cache. However, this IIS cache is a native output cache that offers increased performance over the managed output cache in ASP.NET.

Enable kernel cache

Enables the kernel cache, which stores cached responses in kernel mode. Performance is improved when responses are returned from the kernel cache without transitioning to user mode.

Maximum cached response size (in bytes)

Specifies the maximum size of a cached response for both the user-mode and kernel-mode caches. The default value is 262144 bytes. This field is enabled at the server level only; it is read-only at all other levels.

Cache size limit (in MB)

Configures the size limit of both the user-mode and kernel-mode caches. You can type a size (in MB) or type 0. If you type 0, IIS uses half of the available physical memory or virtual memory, whichever is less. This field is enabled at the server level only; it is read-only at all other levels.

See Also

 

 

End of Update

 

The Out of Memory Line 0 was one issue very difficult to correct when using shared hosting servers.

I ended up splitting the website up on two different hosts and found the actual server was out of memory.

That was one of the reasons. I'll repost other findings once I transfer the forms ASP here.

Other issues could be long loops or array data.

If you do use shared hosting check your code on your local non-production server for memory use.

If you're on a shared host with a common applications pool be sure you're not leaking that small memory to it's end. You can touch the site by changing a process to recycle your applications pool and test if you are shared hosting. I would change the .Net settings to force the recyle since you can't actually do a recycle on a shared host.

The second item that I found was the way I scripted by Loop . I found by debugging that if I limited the loop without letting it reach the end of a database it was faster and yes less time and memory.

Basically memory leaks started to show as more people came online. When more than 100 simultaneous connections were made the spike was up into the 600Mb. I'll post up more suggestions and where I find my biggest holes as I write more code for an old site.

Read the Buffer Limit Exceeded post that might give you some idea on Response.Flush buffer memory debugging.

 

 

Out of Memory Line 0 ASP Classic SQL vb scripts. The Out of Memory Line 0 was one issue very difficult to correct when using shared hosting servers.