by   January 15 2015   
When all you have is room to grow then code a little more and don't ever settle for less than 100 include pages. From my first Pentium 90Mhz IIS Server to my current I've always liked the Function and Sub of ASP Classic. I like it so much I have thousands of Functions and Subs doing things that the best of imaginations might never think of. I am saying I code allot, 2 MB is the max size of any single configuration of a page on my IIS ASP server. That's 2MB of Pure Dynamic Power Pages then I have to add that CSS and Java stuff you all want us to use. Now my page is big, slow and scores like crap on YSlow (75%) but 95% on others.

2.02Mb (2,126,661 bytes) 123 files in 10 folders and all are ASP Classic Included Pages.

So what if it's big, bad and does more than your cheesy framework could ever do.
Ok, maybe your framework would make my includes smaller but I don't mind putting more memory into my 3.3Ghz U1 Intel 8 core of ass kicking power that also doubles as a room heater in the winter months.

So you've asked about cache, you've tried to make your site that is 100% (or you thought) dynamic cache like a static site.
You've moved more things around trying to pass simple tests like YSlow and you've used tools from http://gtmetrix.com/ and others.

So what's the big deal?
Developers from around the globe talk about "Lean is Better" but when I talk lean I want CSS and Java Lean not my ASP Classic Code.
My code can be and is over the top in size but it still processes in under 20ms, which might be slow for some but when you look at every feature and put them all together divide by the content and look at the HTML output you'll see it's clean, mean and seriously all my flavor. It's slower when I add the SQL Db connections (2 to 3) that pipe in data from a few other servers and then back again. So what, I bet everyone has multiple SQL Servers running in their Virtual 2008 Server installs. Don't you? (PostgreSQL and MS-SQL)

Except for the stuff like CSS, Java and those dang Frameworks that run client side.
If they could only make a full java style python coded ASP working VB DLL powered server side so all the client needed was text and images that would be great.
But that's not going to happen today.

Here's my settings for my Web.Conf for IIS 7.x with your ASP Classic website.
I find the Web.Conf handy at times.

Good stuff from Stackoverflow.com and thanks for linking back to my cache setup page.

I have added my other configurations just in case that was one of your other questions.
Instead of writing more about web.config this is what I use for ASP Classic pages on IIS 7.5 running on Server 2008 R2 Standard.
Hardware is 12Tb, 3.3Ghz 8 core Intel SB1200 U1 server. I really like it for how little it consumes in power, it's going to be run from pure solar as soon as the sun comes back.

The order of things.
The first thing is to tell the server what is static and what is dynamic when it comes to cache.
You also need to setup a quick drive HHD or Spindle 6Gb and create a folder on that drive for your Compression Directory.


<!-- Good Stuff on GZip IIS http://stackoverflow.com/questions/702124/enable-iis7-gzip -->
<system.webServer>
<staticContent>
<clientCache cacheControlMode="UseMaxAge" cacheControlMaxAge="30.00:00:00" />
<remove fileExtension=".js" />
<mimeMap fileExtension=".js" mimeType="text/javascript" />
</staticContent>

<httpCompression directory="M:\IIS_COMPRESSION_DIRECTORY">
<scheme name="gzip" dll="%Windir%\system32\inetsrv\gzip.dll" />
<dynamicTypes>
<add mimeType="text/*" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="message/*" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="application/javascript" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="text/css" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="*/*" enabled="false" />
</dynamicTypes>
<staticTypes>
<add mimeType="text/*" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="message/*" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="application/javascript" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="text/css" enabled="true" />
<add mimeType="*/*" enabled="false" />
</staticTypes>
</httpCompression>

<urlCompression doStaticCompression="true" doDynamicCompression="true" dynamicCompressionBeforeCache="true" />
<defaultDocument>
<files>
<clear />
<add value="default.asp" />
<add value="default.aspx" />
<add value="default.htm" />
<add value="index.htm" />
<add value="index.html" />
<add value="iisstart.htm" />
</files>
</defaultDocument>

<!-- Ensure the powered by header is not returned -->
<httpProtocol>
<customHeaders>
<remove name="X-Powered-By" />
<add name="X-UA-Compatible" value="IE=edge,chrome=1" />
<add name="x-xss-protection" value="1; mode=block" />
<add name="x-frame-options" value="SAMEORIGIN" />
<add name="x-content-type-options" value="nosniff" />
</customHeaders>
</httpProtocol>

</system.webServer>
<!-- Snipped my other stuff out which isn't related -->
</configuration>

 

 

When all you have is room to grow then code a little more and don't ever settle for less than 100 include pages. From my first Pentium 90Mhz IIS Server to my current I've always liked the Function and Sub of ASP Classic. I like it so much I have thousands of Functions and Subs doing things that the best of imaginations might never think of. I am saying I code allot, 2 MB is the max size of any single configuration of a page on my IIS ASP server. That's 2MB of Pure Dynamic Power Pages then I have to add that CSS and Java stuff you all want us to use. Now my page is big, slow and scores like crap on YSlow (75%) but 95% on others.